Propionate regulates lymphocyte proliferation and metabolism

AB - Carbon metabolic pathways are important to the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. However, extremely little is known about metabolic regulation in mycobacteria. There is growing evidence for lysine acetylation being a mechanism of regulating bacterial metabolism. Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification in which an acetyl group is covalently attached to the side chain of a lysine residue. This modification is mediated by acetyltransferases, which add acetyl groups, and deacetylases, which remove the acetyl groups. Here we set out to test whether lysine acetylation and deacetylation impact acetate metabolism in the model mycobacteria Mycobacterium smegmatis, which possesses 25 candidate acetyltransferases and 3 putative lysine deacetylases. Using mutants lacking predicted acetyltransferases and deacetylases we showed that acetate metabolism in M. smegmatis is regulated by reversible acetylation of acetyl-CoA synthetase (Ms-Acs) through the action of a single pair of enzymes: the acetyltransferase Ms-PatA and the sirtuin deacetylase Ms-SrtN. We also confirmed that the role of Ms-PatA in regulating Ms-Acs regulation depends on cAMP binding. We additionally demonstrated a role for Ms-Acs, Ms-PatA and Ms-SrtN in regulating the metabolism of propionate in M. smegmatis. Finally, along with Ms-Acs, we identified a candidate propionyl-CoA synthetase, Ms5404, as acetylated in whole-cell lysates. This work lays the foundation for studying the regulatory circuit of acetylation and deacetylation in the cellular context of mycobacteria.


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When activated macrophages start to secrete IL-1, which synergistically with CRH increases ACTH, [10] T-cells also secrete glucosteroid response modifying factor (GRMF), as well as IL-1; both increase the amount of cortisol required to inhibit almost all the immune cells. [11] Immune cells then assume their own regulation, but at a higher cortisol setpoint. The increase in cortisol in diarrheic calves is minimal over healthy calves, however, and falls over time. [58] The cells do not lose all their fight-or-flight override because of interleukin-1's synergism with CRH. Cortisol even has a negative feedback effect on interleukin-1 [10] —especially useful to treat diseases that force the hypothalamus to secrete too much CRH, such as those caused by endotoxic bacteria. The suppressor immune cells are not affected by GRMF, [11] so the immune cells' effective setpoint may be even higher than the setpoint for physiological processes. GRMF affects primarily the liver (rather than the kidneys) for some physiological processes. [59]

40 mcg inhaled twice daily, approximately 12 hours apart, is the recommended starting dose. For patients who do not respond adequately to 40 mcg after 2 weeks of therapy, increasing the dosage to 80 mcg twice daily may provide additional asthma control. The maximum recommended dosage is 80 mcg twice daily. The starting dosage is based on the severity of asthma, including consideration of the patients’ current control of asthma symptoms and risk of future exacerbation. Improvement in asthma symptoms can occur within 24 hours of the beginning of treatment and should be expected within the first or second week, but maximum benefit should not be expected until 3 to 4 weeks of therapy. Improvement in pulmonary function is usually apparent within 1 to 4 weeks after the start of therapy. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program Expert Panel defines low dose therapy as 80 to 160 mcg/day, medium dose as 161 to 320 mcg/day, and high dose therapy as more than 320 mcg/day for children ages 5 to 11 years. The Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines define low dose therapy as 100 mcg/day in this age group. Titrate to the lowest effective dose once asthma stability is achieved.

Propionate regulates lymphocyte proliferation and metabolism

propionate regulates lymphocyte proliferation and metabolism

40 mcg inhaled twice daily, approximately 12 hours apart, is the recommended starting dose. For patients who do not respond adequately to 40 mcg after 2 weeks of therapy, increasing the dosage to 80 mcg twice daily may provide additional asthma control. The maximum recommended dosage is 80 mcg twice daily. The starting dosage is based on the severity of asthma, including consideration of the patients’ current control of asthma symptoms and risk of future exacerbation. Improvement in asthma symptoms can occur within 24 hours of the beginning of treatment and should be expected within the first or second week, but maximum benefit should not be expected until 3 to 4 weeks of therapy. Improvement in pulmonary function is usually apparent within 1 to 4 weeks after the start of therapy. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program Expert Panel defines low dose therapy as 80 to 160 mcg/day, medium dose as 161 to 320 mcg/day, and high dose therapy as more than 320 mcg/day for children ages 5 to 11 years. The Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines define low dose therapy as 100 mcg/day in this age group. Titrate to the lowest effective dose once asthma stability is achieved.

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